Why did the 2nd in command let the person she knew was Triton take over?

That question was stupid. If Hightower knew that her hubby ( as Triton ) would try to take over the seems, then why did the current Second In Command resign and let her hubby (who she suspected was Triton ) take over? Why? That question puzzles me. It also means one of 2 things: 1) The authors are plain stupid to let a questions like that come up in the book? Or, more likely 2) They have a lot of explaining and makeing up to do in the next book. Which, by the way, will be pointless without Becker.

Um, I don't get that. How

Um, I don't get that. How could she not have a say? The court of Appeals? But her husband didn't have any power.

Re:

I've got a copy of the book with me this time, so I don't feel like I'm floundering quite as much. :)

Samuel Hightower wasn't a member of the Powers That Be, but he had been, and he still carried a lot of clout with them and the Seemsians. ("When Samuel Hightower spoke, people in The Seems listened. His term as Second in Command had been the longest in recorded History and his approval ratings astronomically high. Though he had unexpectedly resigned his post seven years ago, he was still a consultant to the Powers That Be and with all the political upheaval, calls for his reinstatement had become louder and louder."). So I may have been off-base saying she didn't have a say, but sometimes even if you do have a say you get overruled by the majority, and it sounds like the majority really, really liked Samuel Hightower.

Also, ten out of the eleven Powers That Be were in favor of Eve's resignation in the first place, and so was the Time Being, though she didn't say anything overt. That probably made it a heck of a lot harder for Eve to try and keep her post and power.

I found the bit where Samuel says he thinks Eve suspects him to be Triton, so I do stand corrected there. Still, like I said, she may just have been outvoted by the majority of Seemsians. She could try to convince them that Samuel was Triton, but that might not work: First, the Seemsians like Samuel as is; and the whole thing could backfire on her and make it look as if she's just trying for petty revenge after losing her position or something.

:) Ashe

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"I just wanna make a little correction to something you said, see. It's not 'our boys'. It's 'MY boys'. Not 'our boys'."
- Howlin' Mad Murdock stakes his claim to the A-Team and makes sure nobody else horns in on it.

Re:

The books never specifically say that Eve Hightower knew who Triton was, do they? She got ousted--or resigned--because she was in command when everything went off the rails, not specifically to let Triton take over. Anyway, as far as I remember, Triton was elected by the Seemsians, which means that Eve probably would have had little say in it even if she did know.

I wouldn't label either the authors as stupid or the next book as pointless just because of this question (or Becker currently not being about). It isn't as if The Seems is the first book series ever to have a plot hole or two, or a cliff-hanger ending.

:) Ashe

--

"I just wanna make a little correction to something you said, see. It's not 'our boys'. It's 'MY boys'. Not 'our boys'."
- Howlin' Mad Murdock stakes his claim to the A-Team and makes sure nobody else horns in on it.

Thanks. I guess I was a

Thanks. I guess I was a little mad at the authors after I read the train of thought. But I believe that The Time Being said ( page 263 ) that she suspected that Eva knew who they were.

Re:

Ahh, you could be right. I don't have a copy of the book to hand right now, but I'll take your word for it.

My other point still stands, though: She may simply not have had a say in the matter.

:) Ashe

--

"I just wanna make a little correction to something you said, see. It's not 'our boys'. It's 'MY boys'. Not 'our boys'."
- Howlin' Mad Murdock stakes his claim to the A-Team and makes sure nobody else horns in on it.